News in brief 8.1.12

Symptoms of depression are linked with shorter survival times among cancer patients, according to a new study at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. This link may be attributed to abnormal stress hormone regulation and inflammatory gene expression. "Our findings, and those of others, suggest that mental health and social well-being can affect biological processes, which influence cancer-related outcomes," Lorenzo Cohen, a professor and director of the Integrative Medicine Program, said in a university news release. The findings "also suggest that screening for mental health should be part of standard care because there are well-accepted ways of helping people manage distress, even in the face of a life-threatening illness," Cohen added.

(Undated) -- Last month, the Supreme Court handed down a landmark ruling on President Obama's signature piece of legislation so far: the Affordable Care Act. The High Court upheld the constitutionality of the law, which aims to make health care more accessable and, as its name suggests, more affordable for Americans.

Cancer news in brief for the week of July 9th

The world's fastest camera, developed by UCLA engineers, is being used to detect rogue cancer cells.

Radio Smart Talk for Friday, June 29:

Thursday's U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding the Affordable Care Act is being called one of the most important rulings in 80 years.

News for the week of June 28th 2012

The Supreme Court upheld President Obama’s health care overhaul law with a 5-4 vote on Thursday. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. joined the court’s four more liberal members with his deciding vote.

Cancer news headlines from the week of 6.18.12-

Scientists have learned how a common cold virus can kill tumors and trigger an immune response, like a vaccine, when injected into the blood stream.  This is a significant step forward in developing this new cancer treatment.

York) -- People living in York County's public housing will no longer be able to smoke in their homes starting this fall.

Why is it important to have a conversation about minorities and cancer?   Dr. Oralia Dominic of Penn State Hershey College of Medicine says, “When you hear the word ‘cancer,’ you associate it with a death sentence. 20 or 30 years ago, there wasn’t a lot of hope. But today, in 2012, we are more advanced in what we know and the tools that are available to detect and, treat and prevent the disease.  My hopes for this conversation are that individuals are inspired and encouraged to take action and take control of their health.“

Washington, D.C., May 29, 2012—The National Breast Cancer Coalition (NBCC) applauds Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) who, along with Senators Collins (R-ME), Brown (D-OH), Murkowski (R-AK), Shaheen (D-NH), Heller (R-NV), Warner (D-VA) and Grassley (R-IA) introduced legislation, S. 3237, aimed at ending breast cancer. Similar legislation, H.R. 3067, was introduced in the House of Representatives last fall by Reps. Karen Bass (D-CA-33) and Rep. Charlie Bass (R-NH-2) and currently has more than 210 bipartisan cosponsors.

The confusing and ever-changing world of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing has just taken another turn thanks to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) publication of new guidelines for cervical cancer screening. The new recommendations were released this past March with the hallmark being less frequent testing and the confusion and frustration has already started.

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