"Though a life has ended, it won't really end depending how person is celebrated and remembered." Emilio Parga, MA, is the Founder & Executive Director of The Solace Tree in Reno, Nevada, a grief and loss center for children, teens and families.

“Grief is neither a problem to solve nor a difficulty to overcome.  It’s a sacred sorrow worthy of expression.”  These are the words of child grief expert Leslie Delp, who helped a group of parents, teachers, and caregivers understand grief through the eyes of a child at a community forum.

[Harrisburg], May 17, 2012 – A new survey from the American Cancer Society finds women are 10 percent less likely than men to make time for physical activities they enjoy and that 40 percent of women said they would be more physically active in their free time if it felt less like work and more like play.

As a result, the American Cancer Society’s Choose You movement is calling on women to help close this gap and to discover fun ways to get active with its 100,000 Acts of Play Challenge.

Camp Mend A Heart, a one-day camp designed to support grieving children who have experienced a death of a loved one, will be held Saturday, June 2, at Camp Cann-Edi-On near York Haven, Pa.

As the U.S. population grows in number and in age, the question of how we will continue to provide health care for our citizens is a critical one. An imminent nursing shortage—as evidenced by the lack of sufficient students currently enrolled in nursing programs—has made nursing one of the most in-demand careers in coming decades, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics expecting better than average job growth for the field between 2010 and 2020.

Does a positive attitude help to fight cancer?  Many people, including lots of cancer survivors, think so.

At this special community forum, child grief experts Leslie Delp, M.A. (founder and bereavement specialist at Olivia’s House in York, PA) along with Emilio Parga, M.A. (founder and director at The Solace Tree in Reno, Nevada), helped us sort through myths, fears, and questions related to children’s grief.

“These dogs do just a wonderful thing for kids and families that are here,” says Steve Turner, a volunteer with the Red Cross Animal Assisted Therapy Program.  He and his therapy dog, Tootsie, visit kids and their families at the Ronald McDonald House in Hershey.  He says, “A lot of times they just find the comfort of a dog who will love and listen unconditionally.”

(Orlando) -- Many times, when someone is diagnosed with cancer, a spouse, family member, or friend will act as a caregiver to help with the patient's needs. But sometimes caregivers become so engrossed in looking after their loved ones, they forget to take care of themselves.

“I would never take my child to the funeral.  She doesn’t understand anyway.”
“I figure I'll just take the pictures down of Nana for a while.  Being reminded of her will only upset my son more.”
“My teenager doesn’t talk about his dad anymore.  I’m so glad he is over that.”
“I’m afraid I’m gonna say something wrong so I won’t say anything at all."

Can you relate to some of these comments about the way that children grieve?  You’re not alone.

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