Lawrence Tyler and Carol Brown have been friends since high school but recently joined forces to create a photography business, Tyler Brown Photography, in York, PA. They do it all- weddings, parties, portraits. But, recently, they’ve created a special project about something that has touched both of their lives deeply: cancer.

We have all heard the startling numbers. Two thirds of Americans are either overweight or obese.

“I don’t need to go to the doctor.  I’m fine.”  Isn’t that the script we often hear from men about our health and our need for medical services?  And, this is the first hurdle to overcome when talking about men’s health issues.

Why is it important to have a conversation about minorities and cancer?   Dr. Oralia Dominic of Penn State Hershey College of Medicine says, “When you hear the word ‘cancer,’ you associate it with a death sentence. 20 or 30 years ago, there wasn’t a lot of hope. But today, in 2012, we are more advanced in what we know and the tools that are available to detect and, treat and prevent the disease.  My hopes for this conversation are that individuals are inspired and encouraged to take action and take control of their health.“

Washington, D.C., May 29, 2012—The National Breast Cancer Coalition (NBCC) applauds Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) who, along with Senators Collins (R-ME), Brown (D-OH), Murkowski (R-AK), Shaheen (D-NH), Heller (R-NV), Warner (D-VA) and Grassley (R-IA) introduced legislation, S. 3237, aimed at ending breast cancer. Similar legislation, H.R. 3067, was introduced in the House of Representatives last fall by Reps. Karen Bass (D-CA-33) and Rep. Charlie Bass (R-NH-2) and currently has more than 210 bipartisan cosponsors.

The confusing and ever-changing world of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing has just taken another turn thanks to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) publication of new guidelines for cervical cancer screening. The new recommendations were released this past March with the hallmark being less frequent testing and the confusion and frustration has already started.

(Lancaster) -- Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. Now that summer's around the corner, it's especially important to take care of the body's largest organ when venturing outside. But many people, including African-Americans and Latinos, don't protect their skin against the sun because they don't think they're at risk of getting skin cancer.

Cancer News May 23, 2012

New lung cancer screening guidelines now recommend annual scans but only for an older group (aged 55 to 74) of current or former heavy smokers.  As the risks of screening younger or older smokers or nonsmokers outweigh any benefits.

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