As the U.S. population grows in number and in age, the question of how we will continue to provide health care for our citizens is a critical one. An imminent nursing shortage—as evidenced by the lack of sufficient students currently enrolled in nursing programs—has made nursing one of the most in-demand careers in coming decades, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics expecting better than average job growth for the field between 2010 and 2020.

This week marks Oral, Head, and Neck Cancer Awareness Week.  These type diseases may not get as much attention as others, but they are the sixth-most-common form of cancer in the world.  Some 50,000 cases of oral, head, and neck cancers are diagnosed each year in the U.S.

Cancer can take a tremendous physical, emotional, and mental toll on those diagnosed with the disease. But how do doctors and scientists, who are charged with treating survivors and conducting cancer research, cope with the disease? What's it like to tell a patient he or she has cancer, or to work tirelessly to come one step closer to finding a cure?

April has been designated nationally as Oral Cancer Awareness Month. This cancer affects 37,000 Americans a year. Oral cancers are also labeled head and neck cancers and include such structures as the tonsils, tongue ,nose , cheek, parotid and the larynx (voice box). When found in the early stage, these cancers can be curable.

(Chester, PA) -- The National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health estimates that more than 50,000 Americans will die from colorectal cancer this year, and another 143,000 cases are expected to be diagnosed. March also marks National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

(Columbus, OH) -- Many times, members of Amish communities view things differently than the rest of the world, including the role of cancer diagnosis and treatment.

How do cancer rates in the Amish community compare to cancer rates in the rest of the population?  A geneticist at the Ohio University set out to answer that question.

In our new "Ask the Experts" video blog series, expert oncologists in Central PA help us answer thought-provoking questions about cancer.

We asked Dr. Shanthi Sivendran, a hematologist/oncologist at Lancaster General Health to help us answer these questions:

Is there more cancer today then ever?
Can stress cause cancer?

Entire months are dedicated to bringing awareness to certain types of cancers, but what about those cancers that don’t affect as many people?

When you get a diagnosis of cancer, the fight to survive becomes personal.  A unique set of challenges faces each cancer patient.  This special episode of TV Smart Talk, "Making It Personal," highlights advances like targeted-light therapy, robotic-assisted surgery and clinical trials now underway to find a recovery path that makes the most sense for each patient.

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A message from the Facing Cancer Together team: We invite you to join us in this community partnership. Share. Connect. Learn. No matter how cancer has affected you, our multimedia tools can help you gain confidence in your choices. In the coming months, this site will evolve with your participation. Meet the team!

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witf Lancaster General Health Pinnacle Health System Wellspan
witf Pinnacle Health System Wellspan Lancaster General Health
witf Wellspan Lancaster General Health Pinnacle Health System