“Why not go out on a limb? Isn’t that where the fruit is?”  This quote from an unknown author caught my attention. Always having been a seeker, having been diagnosed with cancer has only deepened my seeking behaviors. After you read this blog, you will either be intrigued or think I have lost my marbles. Either way, I have been awakened to the many sources available to us that we often ignore or think not to be credible.

The National Cancer Institute estimates more than 1.6 million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in 2012.  The overwhelming majority of them will be treated conventionally or traditionally with surgery, chemotherapy or radiation therapy.  For many, those treatments won't stop the pain and discomfort or will have side effects that present a new set of issues.  Often, they'll opt for alternative therapy or complementary medicine.

Knowing your family medical history is important.  What rights do adoptees in Pennsylvania have to obtain information about their biological parents' medical histories?

Amy Goodling, 30 years old, is a seven-and-a-half year ovarian cancer survivor.  But, her fear at the time wasn’t chemotherapy and wasn’t fighting the cancer.  “It was whether I was going to be able to have children,” she said.

Does a positive attitude help to fight cancer?  Many people, including lots of cancer survivors, think so.

At this special community forum, child grief experts Leslie Delp, M.A. (founder and bereavement specialist at Olivia’s House in York, PA) along with Emilio Parga, M.A. (founder and director at The Solace Tree in Reno, Nevada), helped us sort through myths, fears, and questions related to children’s grief.

Shelly Lipscomb Echeverria, who says that she’s called “Survivor Shel” by her friends, has a unique way that she’s sharing her journey with breast cancer.  She created a series of original paintings that tells the very personal story of her journey. 

(Mount Laurel, NJ) -- A few years ago, Jarrod Skole of Mount Laurel, New Jersey was an average ten-year-old who enjoyed playing sports and hanging out with his friends. Then, he was diagnosed with bladder cancer. Jarrod found visualization helped him cope with the disease, which he says he knew nothing about when he was going through treatment.

“These dogs do just a wonderful thing for kids and families that are here,” says Steve Turner, a volunteer with the Red Cross Animal Assisted Therapy Program.  He and his therapy dog, Tootsie, visit kids and their families at the Ronald McDonald House in Hershey.  He says, “A lot of times they just find the comfort of a dog who will love and listen unconditionally.”

“Being able to accept the gift of Tai Chi and of yoga, and to practice quietness within yourself gives you a tremendous benefit-that is hard to describe, but you do something that helps to change your perspective and your ability to achieve," says Tai Chi instructor, Nathan Spivey.

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