Multimedia Audio

Death is a topic we often don’t talk about.  It could be one of the reasons more of us aren’t prepared for our funerals or haven’t conveyed our wishes to family members.

(Boston, MA) -- With balmy temperatures hitting the region within the past couple of weeks, many Central Pennsylvanians have been spending time outside enjoying the sunny skies. But spending too much time in the sun can be dangerous, potentially leading to skin cancer and complications for some cancer patients themselves.

A National Institute of Health funded study published last week reported that research showed a low-carb diet, that emphasized fish, chicken, beef and some fruits and vegetables while avoiding pasta, bread, and potatoes, resulted in about 300 fewer calories than low-fat and Mediterranean type diets.  Is it the final word on how to lose or maintain weight?

(Hanover) -- More than 20 years ago, Lynn Eib was a busy, young mother to three small daughters. Then, her doctor delivered some devastating news: She had stage III colon cancer. Now, Eib's cancer-free and working as a cancer patient advocate to help others who are going through what she once did.

Radio Smart Talk for Friday, June 29:

Thursday's U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding the Affordable Care Act is being called one of the most important rulings in 80 years.

(Harrisburg) -- Surviving cancer is often times the most daunting challenge a person faces in life. While many people feel grateful or proud to have survived cancer, others feel guilty.

Why is it important to have a conversation about minorities and cancer?   Dr. Oralia Dominic of Penn State Hershey College of Medicine says, “When you hear the word ‘cancer,’ you associate it with a death sentence. 20 or 30 years ago, there wasn’t a lot of hope. But today, in 2012, we are more advanced in what we know and the tools that are available to detect and, treat and prevent the disease.  My hopes for this conversation are that individuals are inspired and encouraged to take action and take control of their health.“

(Lancaster) -- Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. Now that summer's around the corner, it's especially important to take care of the body's largest organ when venturing outside. But many people, including African-Americans and Latinos, don't protect their skin against the sun because they don't think they're at risk of getting skin cancer.

Uplifting Athletes is a non-profit organization that raises money for the research of rare diseases. It all began in 2003 when former Penn State football player Scott Shirley learned that his father was diagnosed with kidney cancer, which is considered a rare disease since fewer than 200,000 Americans are afflicted by it.

(Mount Joy) -- More than fifteen years ago, scores of firefighters from Central Pennsylvania helped put out a fire at the PennDOT headquarters in Harrisburg. Later, they'd find out they were exposed to asbestos and other substances that could lead to lung cancer.

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